United Kingdom Encyclopedia of Law     Wiki Legal Encyclopedia (BETA)
What do you need to know about law? Search in more than 1.500.000 entries

Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights in United Kingdom

“The 47 member nations of the Council of Europe agreed a package of reforms at a conference in Brighton in 2012. These reforms were published in the Brighton Declaration. The plan is to amend the introduction to the European Convention on Human Rights (known as the preamble) to include the principle of subsidiarity, a principle developed in the ECtHR’s case law and which under these reforms will be expressly mentioned in the Convention. There is some disagreement about what exactly is meant by the ‘principle of subsidiarity’, but the Brighton Declaration refers to a shared responsibility between State Parties and the European Court of Human Rights for realising the effective implementation of the Convention and the fact that States Parties may choose how to fulfil their obligations under the Convention. This reflects the fact that the Convention system is subsidiary to the safeguarding of human rights at national level and that national authorities are in principle better placed than an international court to evaluate local needs and conditions.
The preamble will also be amended to expressly state that State Parties enjoy a margin of appreciation in how they apply and implement the Convention, depending on the circumstances of the case and the rights and freedoms engaged.

The Brighton Declaration proposes a number of reforms to the court process to try and reduce the backlog of cases. Applicants may be charged a fee to bring a case to the court, and a tighter admissibility test will be applied to filter out weak cases. The Declaration states that an application should be rejected as manifestly ill-founded “unless the Court finds that the application raises a serious question affecting the interpretation or application of the Convention”. The time limit for bringing claims will be reduced from six to four months. The court will be given the power to give advisory opinions. The selection process for judges will be improved. These amendments now have to be adopted by each
Member State and it is intended that this will be done by the end of 2013.”

Source: Update to English Legal System (Elliot).

See Also

The European Court of Human Rights
The European Court of Human Rights Administration
The European Convention on Human Rights
Human Rights (ECHR) Milestone Cases
YL v Birmingham City Council (2007)

Buy your Vintage Company Today

A vintage ready made (or vintage off the shelf) company is one that has already been formed at Companies House a long time ago; a registered company with a company number available for immediate use.
  • UP TO DATE. All our vintage ready-made companies are up to date, with dormant statutory filing.
  • AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. Company number is available for immediate use.
  • COMPETITIVE PRICES. Vintage company prices vary depending on date of formation, but we have the best prices.
Prices by year of formation:
  • 17-Jun-03: £4.900
  • 25-Jun-03: £4.900
  • 30-sep-03: £4.800
  • 04-Jan-05: £3.900
  • 17-Oct-05: £3.700
  • 17-Oct-05: £3.700
  • 13-Jul-07: £2.900
If you would like to buy 3 UK Vintage Shelf Companies or more, we would like to offer you discounts on net prices. Contact us to law@braxton.uk.com.

Law is our Passion


This entry about Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0) licence, which permits unrestricted use and reproduction, provided the author or authors of the Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights entry and the Encyclopedia of Law are in each case credited as the source of the Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights entry. Please note this CC BY licence applies to some textual content of Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights, and that some images and other textual or non-textual elements may be covered by special copyright arrangements. For guidance on citing Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights (giving attribution as required by the CC BY licence), please see below our recommendation of "Cite this Entry".

Cite this entry

Legal Citations Generator

(2013, 05). Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights lawi.org.uk Retrieved 01, 2021, from https://lawi.org.uk/brighton-declaration-of-the-european-court-of-human-rights/

05 2013. 01 2021 <https://lawi.org.uk/brighton-declaration-of-the-european-court-of-human-rights/>

"Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights" lawi.org.uk. lawi.org.uk, 05 2013. Web. 01 2021. <https://lawi.org.uk/brighton-declaration-of-the-european-court-of-human-rights/>

"Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights" lawi.org.uk. 05, 2013. Accesed 01 2021. https://lawi.org.uk/brighton-declaration-of-the-european-court-of-human-rights/

International, 'Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights' (lawi.org.uk 2013) <https://lawi.org.uk/brighton-declaration-of-the-european-court-of-human-rights/> accesed 2021 January 28

Usage Metrics

789 Views. 584 Visitors.

Google Scholar: Search for Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights Related Content

 

Schema Summary

  • Article Name: Brighton Declaration of the European Court of Human Rights
  • Author: International
  • Description: The 47 member nations of the Council of Europe agreed a package of reforms at a conference in Brighton in 2012. These [...]

This entry was last updated: November 4, 2020

BR


European Law


Human rights

Recent Comments