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Impotent in United Kingdom

The Aged and Impotent (or Infirm) and the 1834 Report

In this issue about the aged and impotent (or infirm), the book “English Poor Law Policy” [1] reads as follows: An almost similar absence of proposals is to be noted with regard to the aged and impotent. The current practice was to deal with these cases, as a rule, by outdoor relief. On this the Commissioners observe merely that “the outdoor relief to the impotent (using that word as comprehending all except the able-bodied and their families) is subject to less abuse…. No use can be made of the labour of the aged and sick, and there is little room for jobbing if their pensions are paid in money. Accordingly, we find that even in places distinguished in general by the most wanton parochial profusion, the allowances to the aged and infirm are moderate.” The Commissioners made no proposal that outdoor relief to the aged or impotent (or infirm) should be abolished, or even curtailed.

Such “aged and really impotent” persons as were accommodated in the workhouse were to have a separate building to themselves, under a separate superintendent; expressly in order that “the old might enjoy their indulgences.”

Passing now to those proposals of the Report which affected paupers generally, these concern the organisation of the workhouse, emigration and relief on loan.

The Aged and Impotent, the Act of 1834 and its Amendments

In this issue about the aged and impotent, the book “English Poor Law Policy” [1] reads as follows: The only provision relating to the aged and impotent as such was the express retention of the Justices’ power to order outdoor relief without limit of amount or period. This was made subject to the conditions that the person should be [1] wholly unable to work, (2) entitled to relief in the union, and (3) desirous of outdoor relief; and that (4) the order should be given by two Justices “usually acting for the district,” one of whom had satisfied himself of his own knowledge that the conditions were fulfilled.

Resources

Notes and References

  1. Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb, “English Poor Law Policy” (1913), Longmans, Green and Co., London, New York, Bombay and Calcuta.

See Also

Resources

Notes and References

  1. Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb, “English Poor Law Policy” (1913), Longmans, Green and Co., London, New York, Bombay and Calcuta.

See Also



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  • Article Name: Impotent
  • Author: Anthony Lincoln
  • Description: The Aged and Impotent (or Infirm) and the 1834 Report In this issue about the aged and impotent (or infirm), the book [...]

This entry was last updated: March 24, 2017

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Revolution of 1834


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