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Non-residents in United Kingdom

Non-Residents and the Poor Law Commissioners

In this issue about non-residents, the book “English Poor Law Policy” [1] reads as follows: A new class of persons arises in the documents after 1834, namely those who are not residing in the parish or union to which they apply for relief. There had grown up a custom under the old Poor Law by which, in order to save the expense and hardships of removal, parishes agreed to grant outdoor relief to persons belonging to them by settlement, who were residing elsewhere. The Central Authority set itself to restrict this practice. By various of its early Orders it prohibited it altogether, and at once (with the usual exceptions of sickness, accident, and urgent necessity) in the case of able-bodied male persons between sixteen and sixty. It prohibited it as regards all new cases for all other persons with the same exceptions. Between this date and 1844 we find the same series of exceptions allowed to this general prohibition as in the case of outdoor relief to the able-bodied and their families; and these exceptions became stereotyped in Art. 3 of the Outdoor Relief Prohibitory Order of 1844 (still in force).

Non-Residents and the Poor Law Board

In this issue about non-residents, the book “English Poor Law Policy” [1] reads as follows: There was no change in the policy of preventing relief to paupers not resident within the union. The Outdoor Relief Regulation Order of 1852 embodied the prohibition with the same exceptions as had been contained in the Outdoor Relief Prohibitory Order of 1844, omitting, however, that of widows without children during the first six months of their widowhood. But, as has been already mentioned, at the very end of the period the Boarding-Out Orders of 1869, etc., permitted children to be maintained outside the union.

Non-Residents and the Local Government Board

In this issue about non-residents, the book “English Poor Law Policy” [1] reads as follows: There is no change to record in 1871 in the expressed policy of preventing relief to paupers not resident within the union. Such relief (given in order to avoid the expense and hardship of removal) continued in many cases, but was repeatedly blamed by the inspectors. “Non-resident relief is given in almost all the unions … sixteen per cent of the outdoor paupers of Glendale Union were non-resident.” In 1878 the Central Authority suggested that such relief “might be almost entirely discontinued.” There has been no explicit abrogation of this policy down to the present day; even in face of representations that it is “harsh and totally out of keeping with the spirit of the times.” But from 1871 onwards we have the force of the maxim weakened by the growth of whole classes of cases which the guardians are allowed, and even encouraged, to send to places outside the union, and maintain there. We need do no more than allude to the boarded-out children. Another growing class is that of paupers who are placed in certified schools or homes, either by way merely of boarding-school (frequently recommended as a method of disposing of Roman Catholic children); or for residence in any industrial or reformatory school; or (irrespective of age) for maintenance in an institution for special treatment (blind, deaf and dumb, crippled, epileptic, idiot, etc.); or merely in an asylum for the aged and infirm; or for curative treatment in a hospital, convalescent home, seaside home, or sanatorium. Even able-bodied aged paupers may, as the Poplar Guardians were informed in 1896, be boarded out in country families, under the guise of non-resident relief. The Central Authority has not objected to the transfer of workhouse inmates, provided these do not actively protest, to country workhouses, there to be maintained as non-resident paupers. In one case, indeed, the Central Authority allowed a union to abolish its workhouse altogether (retaining only a casual ward), and approved “arrangements for the boarding-out of the indoor poor in the workhouses of other unions for a period not exceeding five years.” It is, therefore, not easy to determine how much is left of the policy of preventing non-resident relief as such.

Resources

Notes and References

  1. Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb, “English Poor Law Policy” (1913), Longmans, Green and Co., London, New York, Bombay and Calcuta.

See Also

Resources

Notes and References

  1. Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb, “English Poor Law Policy” (1913), Longmans, Green and Co., London, New York, Bombay and Calcuta.

See Also

Non-Residents and the Local Government Board

In this issue about non-residents, the book “English Poor Law Policy” [1] reads as follows: There is no change to record in 1871 in the expressed policy of preventing relief to paupers not resident within the union. Such relief (given in order to avoid the expense and hardship of removal) continued in many cases, but was repeatedly blamed by the inspectors. “Non-resident relief is given in almost all the unions … sixteen per cent of the outdoor paupers of Glendale Union were non-resident.” In 1878 the Central Authority suggested that such relief “might be almost entirely discontinued.” There has been no explicit abrogation of this policy down to the present day; even in face of representations that it is “harsh and totally out of keeping with the spirit of the times.” But from 1871 onwards we have the force of the maxim weakened by the growth of whole classes of cases which the guardians are allowed, and even encouraged, to send to places outside the union, and maintain there. We need do no more than allude to the boarded-out children. Another growing class is that of paupers who are placed in certified schools or homes, either by way merely of boarding-school (frequently recommended as a method of disposing of Roman Catholic children); or for residence in any industrial or reformatory school; or (irrespective of age) for maintenance in an institution for special treatment (blind, deaf and dumb, crippled, epileptic, idiot, etc.); or merely in an asylum for the aged and infirm; or for curative treatment in a hospital, convalescent home, seaside home, or sanatorium. Even able-bodied aged paupers may, as the Poplar Guardians were informed in 1896, be boarded out in country families, under the guise of non-resident relief. The Central Authority has not objected to the transfer of workhouse inmates, provided these do not actively protest, to country workhouses, there to be maintained as non-resident paupers. In one case, indeed, the Central Authority allowed a union to abolish its workhouse altogether (retaining only a casual ward), and approved “arrangements for the boarding-out of the indoor poor in the workhouses of other unions for a period not exceeding five years.” It is, therefore, not easy to determine how much is left of the policy of preventing non-resident relief as such.

Resources

Notes and References

  1. Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb, “English Poor Law Policy” (1913), Longmans, Green and Co., London, New York, Bombay and Calcuta.

See Also

Resources

Notes and References

  1. Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb, “English Poor Law Policy” (1913), Longmans, Green and Co., London, New York, Bombay and Calcuta.

See Also



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  • Article Name: Non-residents
  • Author: Anthony J. Bland
  • Description: Non-Residents and the Poor Law Commissioners In this issue about non-residents, the book English Poor Law Policy [1] reads [...]

This entry was last updated: May 22, 2017

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